Saturday, November 8, 2014

Spin Dry

Ziva decided to play catch-and-return with me in an area filled with thick, tall liriope.  This meant that the ball sometimes landed in a patch that concealed it, leading to some turning and searching, and giving me a brief moment to grab a camera and grab some shots.  



You've probably seen some hilarious photos of dogs shaking themselves after a bath.  Well, even though Ziva was barely moist from some wet grass, she did a quick head spin to dry out, and what it did to her face for a split second is pretty funny, in my opinion.  This is something only a camera could see, too quick for the human visual system to process as anything other than a blur.


Ziva may never admire herself on a computer screen or a printed page, but I still feel I have to make up for the silly moment above by showing the more attractive capture below.


Permalink: http://jilcp.blogspot.com/2014/11/spin-dry.html

4 comments:

  1. Oh, wow, what a treat! This is the first time, I think, I've seen her holding her tail so erect...she must be so very happy!! I love how you call fetch "catch and return" - so much more respectful of her. She is so alert and playful...what a joy!! Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing these lovely photos!!!!

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    1. My pleasure! The attitude of her tail varies a lot, and I suppose is part of any dog's emotional signals, but yes, Ziva's carriage seems to display more changes than most of the other dogs we meet. Body language can be so expressive. Imagine if people had kept the tails of their distant ancestors!

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  2. This is a cool story:

    "Dogs are powerful sniffers: though sensitivity varies by species, their noses can be 10,000 to 100,000 times stronger than those of humans. Law enforcement agencies around the world have long put that canine advantage to work, using “sniffer dogs” to uncover everything from explosives to illegal drugs. Now, through an initiative supported by TRAFFIC and WWF, man’s best friend is turning its nose to wildlife crime."

    http://www.worldwildlife.org/magazine/issues/winter-2014/articles/detection-dogs-and-wildlife-crime?link=txt&utm_campaign=magazine&utm_medium=email&utm_source=engagement&utm_content=1411t

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    1. That's a great use for canine olfactory abilities!

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